Rollei Planar 1.8 50 HFT – Carl Zeiss Planar 1.8 50

Rollei-HFT_Planar_1_8_50_18

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  • Guest

    The Carl Zeiss Planar 1.8/50 for the SL Rollei was a 100% Zeiss design and built 😉 It was designed by the most famous CZ optical designer of all times Erhard Galtzell and his colleague Erwin Knochak . The first few ones when made in the Oberkochen Factory as we can see int he pics attached using the Zeiss Opton brand 😉

    The later early ones with Rollei written in front where made either in a Rollei factory or Oberkochen.
    The M42 lenses were made for the Voigtländer VSL 1TM and Ifbaflex M102 TM made by Rollei.

    • Paolo Amsterd

      The M42 version is NOT uncommon, just not as common as the version with Rollei bayonet.
      The first generation of Rollei and Voigtlander 35mm cameras had M42 mount, with auto diaphragm and stop-down metering.
      The Singapore-made Color-Ultron is the same as the Singapore-made Rollei Planar, which is identical to the German-made version, which in turn is the siamese twin of the Zeiss Planar.
      The difference between Singapore and West Germany objectives is PERHAPS quality control, while the Rollei/Voigtlander lenses differ from Zeiss ones in just one thing: multicoating. HFT instead of Zeiss T*.
      Btw, T*, HFT and Pentax’s SMC were the best multicoating technologies of the time, and must be said that they still prove their worth after so many years!

  • Guest

    Here the pics:

  • Alex

    The Carl Zeiss Planar 1.8/50 for the SL Rollei was a 100% Zeiss design and built 😉 It was designed by the most famous CZ optical designer of all times Erhard Galtzell and his colleague Erwin Knochak . The first few ones when made in the Oberkochen Factory as we can see int he pics attached using the Zeiss Opton brand 😉

    The later early ones with Rollei written in front where made either in a Rollei factory or Oberkochen.

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  • Stef

    According to this page Rollei/Carl Zeiss/Voigtlander Planar 50mm f1.8 is in fact Carl Zeiss Ultron 1.8/50 successor and shares the same optical formula with few tweaks. Front element is no longer concave but slightly convex, the rest is pretty much the same. Not sure but it doesn’t look like a planar formula.

    http://taunusreiter.de/Cameras/Bessa_RF_histo_dt.html

  • RLF

    RLF
    Just few comments, planars have a long history of excellence several improved version were offered for the Rolleiflex twin lens and later for the Hasselblad, but these were not adequate for the smaller 35mm format. Ultron was and outstanding lens, but Zeiss need to rebuild its position in the rapidly expanding 35mm camera industry and Rollei with its reputation was to be its start. So a new and better planar was engineered and despite the ultimate failure of the Rollei 35mm systems the Zeiss Planar for the camera was highly prized. The lens as noted, was assembled in Germany, Singapore and Japan under license from Zeiss and Rollei. For the German and Singapore production lines Zeiss provided fully assembled lens and aperature units which were incorporated in to the final assembly of the finished optical devise. This assured optical quality control on the glass, this was true for all lenses with Zeiss/Voigtlander brands and many Rollinars. The glass for Rollinars were all from Schott.

    When you strip a Planar lens down to repair it you end up with a pile of metal parts and a lens/aperature unit. It the lens aperature unit was bady damaged you just order another one, but mine just need a manual adjustment of the aperture lever. Other wise I would have found a used Planar and replace it.

    The design of the 50mm planar was new and specific, and far more advanced than one would expect, later with some changes to alternate glass developments not requiring radioactive elements the 50mm planar lens remains the same today. I have two 50mm that I use on my Lumix GX7 and still performs very well. If I were still working I would not hesitate to by a new Zeiss 50mm Planar in a ZM mount or an old German made Planar 50mm f/1.4 which is an even better Planar edition. These lenses compete well with Leica M4/3 lenses.

    Regarding the Voigtlander name, it was famous for its lens craft and the first development and patenting of apochromatic glass, but it floundered in its camera design department in the 1950s and Zeiss start buying into the company, ultimately owning it out right. As a shell with good lens craft, equipment and staff Zeiss used it to manufacture its 35mm lens line. Zeiss, has designed many lens that they have had manufactured off site, but labeled Zeiss. Kern in Switzerland was one of the more famous contract lens makers that Zeiss, Schneider and Leica all used. Sometime in the late 1970s Kern was bought by Leitz and in addition to acquiring their surveying business they got their optical expertise also, greatly increasing Leicas lens craft, and some would say beyond their long time competitor Zeiss. Well maybe, but I am not sure as own comparable lenses by both.

    Zeiss has always maintained a tight quality control on its name brand, whether made in a Zeiss plant, Voigtlander, Yashica , or Cosina. They maintain QC and QA, as result I would gladly by a Planar made for and by Yashica or any other company. They are excellent, however, I am really found of my early German Planar for my Rollei SL 35s that bought while in graduate school in the period 1969 to 1972.

    As you all know, Voigtlander was acquire by Cosina along with dyes and equipment to make Bessa cameras. Years ago I reviewed specs for their Voigtlander lens and they were the same as the Zeiss/Voigtlander lens with very specific Schott glass. They have maintained this quality with
    Zeiss’s help and produced lenses for Rollei and Zeiss to this day, well not Rollei anymore.

  • Mischa Bachmann

    I guess my Voigtländer Color-Ultron is identical to these Planar lenses?
    I really love it and would love to get my hands on a Zeiss Planar T* 50mm f/1.4 somewhere in the future.

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